FIND Emerging Jewellers Program


FIND Contemporary Jewellery Collective
at Salamanca Arts Centre are advising of an exciting new opportunity.

What is it?

This is an 8-week opportunity for emerging local jewellers to display and sell their work in a commercial environment; rent free.

Who can apply?

Any emerging jeweller who is based in Tasmania and is not currently showing or selling their work in other shops or galleries. (This excludes student exhibitions and markets).

What is in it for you?

The successful applicant will get a high exposure, rent-free space in a well-established business for a set period of 8 weeks, display props included.

What is the cost?

There is no cost to apply and there is no rent charged. A small commission of 5% is taken on each sale.

What is in it for FIND?

FIND is a collective of 10 jewellers and know how difficult it can be to become established in this field. The space allocated for an emerging jeweller is FIND’s way of supporting the local arts community.

To apply and for more information go to the listing on FIND’s website.

 

 

Searching for Proof of Life during Ten Days on the Island

As part of Ten Days on the Island Salamanca Arts Centre is proud to present Proof of Life: Studio Sessions, which is curated by Elizabeth Woods and Kevin Leong as part of The Homesickness Project.

The Homesickness Project’s thesis is that the role of the world as a home for its citizens is under threat and that collectively, we are increasingly homesick.

Artists, experts, community groups and the general public will participate in a series of events that elaborate on and investigate possible answers to these questions: What does it mean to be civilised within an increasingly market-driven system of social values? What is required from our environment for us to thrive?

“SAC believes in the continuing importance of artists having a key role in provoking, leading and facilitating discussions about the human condition,” says Salamanca Arts Centre Acting CEO Joe Bugden. “We’re excited to see what will develop from this ambitious, multi-faceted collaboration.”

The ensuing discussions, lectures, performances, demonstrations and exhibitions will invite public contribution and form the basis of a major exhibition opening in the Long Gallery in September 2017. This is an opportunity to observe and participate in the creative development of collaborative, socially-engaged art works.

“There is a mission for the arts to address the heightened fears around our global future but there is a shortage of existing tools to do so,” says curator Kevin Leong. “Hobart’s tight-knit, highly-cooperative arts community, where disciplines are fluid, and where broad community contact is sustained, is the ideal environment to develop these tools.”

Featured artists include: Lisa Garland, Paul Gazzola, Laura Purcell, Elizabeth Woods, Kevin Leong, Abdul Hakim Hashemi Hamidi, Dalibor Martinis, Daphne Keramidas, James Newitt, Nick Leitch, Peta Cook, Leigh Hobba, and Hussen Ibraheem and Ameen Nayfeh.

The official launch of the project is this Saturday, 18 March in the Long Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre at 12 noon. This will be followed by a Curator’s Talk and an afternoon discussion forum entitled “Are We Really Alive?”.

Read More

EOIs invited for the position of Executive Producer, SITUATE Art in Festivals

Expressions of Interest are invited for the position of Executive Producer, SITUATE Art in Festivals

Salamanca Arts Centre is seeking to appoint an Executive Producer of interdisciplinary arts projects, programs and arts laboratories for the delivery of SITUATE Art in Festivals.

Funded by the Australia Council for the Arts, SITUATE Art in Festivals  is a program of Salamanca Arts Centre that has national and international reach, and the role of Executive Producer can be based in Hobart or interstate. If based interstate, some travel to Hobart will be required. To learn more about Situate and what we have achieved so far, please view our website, www.situate.org.au

Your EoI should address each of the Selection Criteria listed below, contain your CV (with relevant links), and include three to five referees.

This is a fixed term part-time services contract, which will commence in March 2017 and conclude in December 2018 but with an option to renew the contract for a further 18 months.

The successful applicant will:

  • be passionate about experimental arts (in a variety of art forms including interdisciplinary) and helping early career artists to achieve their potential.have direct experience of working in a variety of arts festivals.
  • have direct experience with the processes required to commission, develop and present/install works in festivals and/or public art programs.
  • have solid experience with experimental artists’ Professional Development programs, and a demonstrable ability to organise, produce and deliver an intensive Professional Developmental Arts Lab (of around two weeks’ duration).
  • have excellent national networks across the contemporary arts sector.
  • have relevant administration experience, well-developed budget and project management skills, winning grant-writing experience and effective communications and team-building skills.
  • be experienced in social media and website management and proficient with a range of relevant programs.
  • have educational qualifications in the arts.
  • have considerable experience in working with/for an arts organisation.
  • have experience with funding agencies and stakeholder communications and reporting.

If you have experience in the key areas, as described, and are looking to take on this exciting and challenging role, you are invited to contact Joe Bugden. To obtain further information about this project. You will be asked to submit a formal Expression of Interest by email to ceo@sac.org.au by Tuesday 7 March 2017..

 

Handmark and Salamanca Arts Centre celebrate contemporary Tasmanian art

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Nick Glade-Wright. Echoes (2016). Oil on Board. 138cm x 138cm

An exhibition revealing the strength and diversity of Tasmanian contemporary art opens in the Long Gallery this Thursday, 19 January at 6.00pm.

Handmark: Contemporary Tasmanian Artists features the work of thirty-nine artists from the stable of one of Salamanca Arts Centre’s oldest and most prominent gallery tenants.

“We are thrilled to kick off the year with this celebration of our association with Handmark,” says Acting CEO Joe Bugden.

“Salamanca Arts Centre is looking forward to inviting the community to come and celebrate its 40th anniversary this year. This is a great way to start everyone thinking about the long history of artists working and exhibiting in these iconic buildings.”

Handmark has been resident in the Arts Centre since July 1987 bringing quality art, design and craft to locals and visitors for more than thirty years. They represent over ninety Tasmanian artists in total.

The exhibition – curated by Handmark director Allanah Dopson – features paintings, prints and drawings and includes artists Alyce Bailey, Adrian Barber, Michaye Boulter, Julie Payne, John Lendis, Helene Weeding, Nick Glade-Wright, Mairi Ward, Faridah Cameron, Blair Waterfield, Hilton Owen, William Rhodes, Ella Noonan, Denise Campbell, Andrew Donohue, Emily Blom, Clifford How, Robyn McKinnon, Peter Gouldthorpe, James Walker, Leonie Oakes, Diane Masters, Jeff Gatt, Kit Hiller, Jenny Armati, Olivia Moroney, Corrine Costello, Elizabeth Lada Gray, Jonathan Partridge, Katina Gavalas, Melissa Smith, Chantale Delrue, Mandy Renard, Kaye Green, Linda Keogh, Jennifer Marshall, Lauren Cross, David Edgar, and Tom Samek.

All works are for sale through Handmark.

HANDMARK: CONTEMPORARY TASMANIAN ARTISTS

curated by Allanah Dopson

Exhibition dates: 14 – 29 January 2017

Exhibition venue: Long Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre, Hobart, Tasmania

Open 10 am until 5 pm daily

Opening: Thursday 19 January at 6:00pm, to be opened by Allanah Dopson and Salamanca Arts Centre Board member Chris Tassell

 

Salamanca Arts Centre CEO Rosemary Miller announces her resignation

HOBART, 27 October 2016After seventeen years in the role of CEO / Artistic Director, Rosemary Miller has announced that she will be resigning on 2 December 2016.

Read Arts Minister Vanessa Goodwin’s statement here.

Rosemary joined Salamanca Arts Centre in December 1999 and over those years has been able to attract high quality national and international artists, exhibitions and performances to Hobart’s Salamanca Arts Centre.

Salamanca Arts Centre (SAC) is Tasmania’s multi-arts creative hub and an integral part of the State’s arts and creative industries infrastructure. SAC is an engine room for art-making and presentation; a centre for artists and designers in-studios; home to many of Tasmania’s leading arts organisations across live performance (theatre, music, dance), film and writing; cultural and commercial galleries and studios for visual arts, crafts and design.

Rosemary leaves SAC having secured arts funding over the next four years through the Australia Council and with just recently having successfully delivered Salamanca Moves, SAC’s inaugural dance festival.

SAC’s Board takes this opportunity to thank Rosemary for her years of leadership, passion and dedication to the organisation,” says Chair Rebecca Roth.

We also warmly welcome our Acting CEO Joe Bugden. He joined SAC in 2014 as the company’s Business Manager.”

Joe comes to this new role with more than 20 years’ experience in senior arts management and administration. Since arriving in Tasmania in 1999 Joe has worked as Executive Director of the Tasmanian Writers’ Centre, as General Manager and Artistic Director of the Tasmanian Readers’ & Writers’ Festival, and more recently taught Business Skills to art and design students at the University of Tasmania’s Centre for the Arts Hunter Street campus.

Salamanca Arts Centre looks forward to the future, enriching the lives of Tasmanians through the arts.

Inaugural Salamanca Moves highlights dancer diversity and risk-taking

MEDIA RELEASE by Salamanca Arts Centre

Rite of Spring, image credit Whats On In app

Rite of Spring, image credit Whats On In app

Salamanca Moves wrapped on Saturday 1 October, concluding with a public dance party and a closing ceremony with members of the Tasmanian Aboriginal community. Tasmanian and visiting dancers participated in over 60 events, with members of the public, ranging from school children to mature movers, from community groups to acclaimed international artists such as Neta Pulvermacher (Israel), Sannamaria Kuula (Finland), Ana Degues (Portugal), Cari Ann Shim Sham (USA) and Liz Aggiss (UK).

“The feedback from many artists has been very positive with many saying that the exchange of ideas enabled by the festival will influence their practice,” says Salamanca Arts Centre CEO/Artistic Director Rosemary Miller. “That’s testament to both Salamanca Moves Curator Kelly Drummond Cawthon’s planning and to the generous and collaborative spirit of participants.”

“We thank all the artists and the local community for getting behind this inaugural event, and the dedicated team of staff and volunteers.”

The world premiere of Rite of Spring by Tasmania’s Second Echo Ensemble proved to be one of the hits of the festival, with the season quickly selling out. Second Echo performer Luke Campbell was one of three artists asked to re-present their festival work during The A.W.A.R.D (Artists with Audiences Responding to Dance) Show on 30 September.

Dianne Reid and Melinda Smith’s Dance Interrogations was awarded $5000 and a slot in next year’s Ten Days on the Island via an audience choice vote. Smith, a dancer living with cerebral palsy, and Reid, and screen dance artist, develop improvisational dance performance that interacts with video projected imagery. Read More

Girls Shred Their Way to Happiness

MEDIA RELEASE by Kickstart Arts

The soon to be Olympic sport of skateboarding has always been a male dominated sport, that is, until just recently. Girls are steadily taking over the urban skate parks of southern Tasmania, and a brand new film that is part of Kickstart Arts’ Counting up to Happiness Project, which screens at The Peacock Theatre from Thursday 21 July to Sunday 24 July tells the story of Australia’s biggest female skateboarding group, She Shreds’.

Local skateboarding legend Jimmy McMacken, who appears in the film, remarked “I’ve never seen anything like it, in all my 30 years of involvement in skateboarding, it’s remarkable, to see so many girls getting so good so quickly, She Shreds has been really positive for the sport, they’ve opened up the parks so a lot more families are coming now.”

She Shreds, Chlobo Jumps

Never before has there been so many girls dropping half pipes and grinding the rails. They are starting as young as four years old and the older ones are really giving the boys a run for their money.

This is all due to the dedication of Jared Andrew, an ex-army man, who with his partner Alison and his two daughters, Bridget and Chloe, founded ‘She Shreds’ a new community of all girl skaters.

“My girls wanted some friends to skate with, so we invited a few girls, and it just grew from there, said Andrew, “I break the skills down so the younger ones can quickly grasp what’s required. The girls who’ve been skating the longest are now competing well in skate competitions, both here and interstate..”

Jared teaches girls from as young as four years old about the basics of skating and supports them to develop their skills to a higher level. A whole new community of skaters has sprung up with many families now getting involved. For the girls, being part of a close knit community, learning skills and feeling the freedom of skating the ramps are a few of the things that mean happiness for them.

Jared tells us that the skateboarding has been transformational for many of the girls, helping them become more focused at school and to overcome problems such as coping with bullying.

“I tell them that every time they overcome their fear of dropping a fourteen foot ramp, they are effectively beating their bullies,” Andrew said, “there’s a feeling that if they can do something like that, they can do anything in their lives.”

smaller smile (1)Filmmaker and community cultural development artist Richard Bladel from Kickstart Arts has been working with the group to make a short film about this amazing Hobart based group.

She Shreds is just one of a number of films that explores the true nature of happiness as part of Kickstart Arts’ The Happiness Project.

Some of Tasmania’s top film makers have worked with Kickstart Arts since 2010. They have made a suite of over 63 films with community members from the far North to the far South of the state.

The films tell local stories with warmth, humour and insight and are brimming with optimism, giving a light of hope at a time when we could all use cheering up.

COUNTING UP TO HAPPINESS PROJECT

Short Tasmanian films about Happiness 2010 – 2016

TICKETS:Full Price $18 / Concession $10 /Family Price (2 Adults + up to 2 kids)$40 (inclusive of fees & charges)
Tickets available ONLINE

SCREENING TIMES:
Thursday 21 July 2016 @ 7:30pm
Friday 22 July 2016 @ 1:00pm – Half Price Matinee – ALL TICKETS $10
Friday 22 July 2016 @ 3:00pm
Friday 22 July 2016 @ 8:00pm
Saturday 23 July 2016 @ 2:00pm – Half Price Matinee – ALL TICKETS $10
Saturday 23 July 2016 @ 6:00pm
Saturday 23 July 2016 @ 8:00pm
Sunday 24 July 2016 @ 11:00am
Sunday 24 July 2016 @4:30pm

PUBLIC FORUM: IS HAPPINESS A MATTER OF SURVIVAL?

This multidisciplinary forum investigates happiness as a matter of individual, community and national importance. It brings together speakers from education, public policy, psychology, philosophy, the arts and community development to investigate what could lead to positive change to what we value as a society, and how we might find collective happiness.

In Australia, it’s estimated that 45 per cent of people will experience a mental health condition in their lifetime, around 1 million Australian adults have depression, and over 2 million have anxiety, between 2010 & 2014, the average number of suicide deaths per year in Australia was 2,577.

CHAIRPERSON:
Dave Noonan – Radio presenter on Heart 1073

SPEAKERS:
Dr Sonam Thakchoe – Senior Philosophy Lecturer at UTAS
Dr Bruno Cayoun – Clinical Psychologist & principal developer of MiCBT
Deborah Mills – Public Policy Consultant Art and Wellbeing
Dr Nicholas Hookway – Lecturer in Sociology, School of Social Sciences, UTAS
Jami Bladel – Artistic Director and CEO of Kickstart Arts Stacey Clancy
Lucy Haigh – Educators from the Institute of Positive Education, Geelong Grammar School, Melbourne

Each speaker will have 10 minutes to address the topic, and there will be a Q and A session of at least 30 minutes.

TICKETS: Full Price $10 / Concession $5
Tickets available ONLINE

EVENT:
Sunday 24 July 2016 @ 2:00pm

 

Salamanca Moves announced

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image by Sam Rosewarne, The Mercury

Celebrating the Diversity of Dance

MEDIA RELEASE by Salamance Arts Centre

Salamanca Arts Centre is pleased to announce Salamanca Moves, a new contemporary dance festival running from 20 September to 1 October 2016 in Hobart, Tasmania.

The inaugural biennial Festival will take place across the Salamanca Precinct, Moonah Arts Centre and surprise pop ups. Aimed at all ages and all abilities, this community Festival offers opportunities to view, create, perform, experiment, and experience new ways of moving.

“We’re delighted to be bringing the power of dance to the Salamanca Precinct. Not only will the Festival celebrate dance as an art form, but also as one of the best exercises you can possibly do.” said Salamanca Arts Centre’s CEO/Artistic Director Rosemary Miller.

Curated by Kelly Drummond Cawthon, the Festival delivers an ambitious and extensive program of free and ticketed dance performances, including the creation of new works and critically acclaimed productions. Dancers of all levels are invited to experiment, and get physical through a series of development dance workshops and performance opportunities led by national and international contemporary dance makers.

“Contemporary dance really is suitable for any BODY and every BODY. It’s an expression of who we are and what moves us” said Drummond Cawthon, “and it’s that philosophy that underpins the whole Festival” Read More

Creating chamber opera Death By Defenestration

This week marks the world premiere of a new opera, Death By Defenestration, presented as part of Festival of Voices and supported by Salamanca Arts Centre’s HyPe program.

The work explores a family’s dark secrets as two brothers struggle with their demons, and their principles. The story takes place in their childhood home where – with their mother caught in the middle – one of the brothers wrestles with what he has witnessed as an Australian war vet from the Iraq war, the other is a proclaimed pacifist and atheist.

The libretto and music of Death By Defenestration is by Joe Bugden, whose first opera was The Call of Aurora and premiered at the Peacock Theatre in 2013. Salamanca Arts Centre spoke to him about the development of the work and his creative process.

Death x Def Poster Image (1)

An excerpt from Death By Defenestration was presented through an IHOS project some years ago but 2016 marks its first iteration as a full-length production. What would you say was the core inspiration for the project?

The first spark was the invasion of Iraq in 2003. I remember that happening for a whole range of reasons, one of which was that it happened and was headline news on the day that the Writers Festival was being launched [Joe ran the Tasmanian Readers and Writers Festival from 1999 until 2008]… Something like that happens and it stops everything…. just pushes everything off the agenda. I had always, like many others, known that the reasons that were given for the invasion were unfounded and untrue. So it was that global context.

Also, as you go through life and you meet people [you realise] that families growing up in a similar context, with the same “brainwashing” – you’d think that they’d grow up with a shared worldview [but] that that’s not the case sometimes. You hear from time to time of families where siblings or children and parents are estranged and really beyond reconciliation.

So it was those two particular contexts. The global, tribal, cultural and religious differences that tear the world apart and how families can be torn apart by as intense and deep philosophical views that take place around a kitchen table.

Why an opera? Why did you feel this material would work in that form?

In the context of arts funding, opera is seen as the bad guy that gets most of the dough, and that’s certainly the case. You can throw as much money into a production as you’ve got and it could still use more. But opera, as a form, goes back five hundred years. The idea of telling stories through song or with song goes back eight hundred years. In church music it goes back a thousand years. So any emotion that words might be able to convey I think are more successfully, more profoundly conveyed when added to music. In simple terms, it’s theatre that uses music to add to the emotion. Not just as a backdrop or a soundtrack but really the music determines the drama.

And so in the creative process what comes first, the musical idea or the story idea?

The story idea. I come up with an idea, do some research… and I write the libretto. I sit down at a piano and then I develop the broad architectural structure to that, so set the words to music, and then orchestrate it for the various instruments.

How does the subject matter inform the style of music that you’re using?

The more you write, the more you paint, the more you act – the more you do whatever it is in a creative way – you do develop your own voice and you say, “This is truly me, for better or for worse. These are the parameters in which I am comfortable, in which I think I know what I’m doing.”

DBD image 3

The cast of Death By Defenestration 2016 working on blocking of a scene with director Lucien Simon.

I try to write beautiful music all the time. Everything I sit down to write I say, “I want this to be the most beautiful music I’ve ever written.” It is quite melodic. The harmony is based on a progressive tonality, so it modulates all the time. But there are moments of sarcasm in the music, there are moments of humour in the music, so there are music devices [that can be] seen as sarcastic because [they’re] out of context with what the serious point of view might be.

I notice from the rehearsals that there are dramatic things happening physically, and Death By Defenestration has been described as an ‘opera noir’. So was it important to you to do something that had something had action in it, rather than people talking and singing about ideas?

Yes, it deals with some dark themes and some heavy issues. The director,Lucien Simon , has come up with a whole range of theatrical initiatives and devices that I could not have imagined. Even now when he tells me what’s going to happen on stage I’m surprised, because when you write something you have assumptions of what might happen, how it will end, and how it will go from beginning to end. What the actors and singers do, so long as its true to the words and to the story, that’s fine…. The body language, the positioning, the physicality, the physical relationship, the facial expressions, all those sorts of things, add to the success of conveying the story and the issues that they’re trying to convey.

Was it difficult to find the right cast? Obviously the roles require quite specific skill sets.

Philip Joughin, who sings the role of Darren, the younger brother, sang in my previous opera, in the role of [Antarctic explorer] Douglas Mawson. Nick Monk, who sings the role of Trevor, the older brother, also sang in my previous opera [and] I was really happy with what they did with the characters in that.

Josephine Giles, who sings the role of the Mother, she was referred to me by some other singers in town. Josephine has sung with the Australian Opera and when I heard her voice and when I met with her for a coffee she taught me a lot about how to write for voice even in twenty minutes over a coffee, it was a wonderful music lesson.

DBD image 2

The cast of Death By Defenestration 2016 working on blocking of a scene.

You do have to write for the voice and it’s not just the range and that’s the wrong question that I’d been asking. When a singer says, “Okay, I’ll sing the role,” I say, “What’s your range?” But there’s a lot more to it than that. You can’t have them right down here low if there’s instrumental music going on because it’s lost. If they’re singing too high all the time, apart from it being a physical strain, it’s difficult for them to articulate the words.

I was told that English is a terrible language to sing opera in and I thought, “Well, that’s silly”. But it’s actually true, because we have lots of “oos” and ees” rather than “ahs” like Italian or Spanish, it is a struggle. So therefore I did have to change the words sometimes to make sure that there singers mouths are open when they’re singing either words very quickly or syllables very quickly and at a pitch that might be reaching the upper or lower limit of their comfortable range.

defen wordWhat kind of experience do you hope that the audience will have when they come and see this production?

First of all, I hope that they are totally enthralled with the music. As the composer, that is my first aim. If that happens, I will be happy with what I’ve been able to do.

I think they will be caught up in the story and the drama that unfolds. We’ve got some animation done by Milly Jencken, who’s a student at the art school. Milly and Georgia Vanderwyk have done the set design… And Lucien Simon deciding to use the Founders Room not in the conventional theatre way but almost as an installation space. What Lucien has done is use the window as a demarcation point of the present interior world and the exterior world, where our nightmares, fears, shame, guilt, and all those things that we try to push away from our day to day existence reside. But we can’t always keep them out.

Death by Defenestration 

50 minutes’ duration with no intermission.

Suitable for audiences 18 and over.

PERFORMANCES:
Wednesday 13 July 2016 @ 7:30pm
Thursday 14 July 2016 @ 7:30pm
Friday 15 July 2016 @ 7:30pm
Saturday 16 July 2016 @ 7:30pm

TICKETS:
Concession $27.00 / Full $36.00
Tickets available ONLINE

Join the facebook event

The production is supported by the Tasmanian Composers Collective, Salamanca Arts Centre, HyPe 2015, and SPACE. HyPe 2015 was supported by Arts Tasmania and the Australia Council for the Arts.

DEATH by DEFEN logos 2016

Radio Gothic in the Peacock Theatre

Radio Gothic (HyPe artists 2015-2016) transform the Peacock Theatre into a nightmarish prison this week as they present their first play, Episode 1: The Pit. 

Katie Robertson rehearsing for the June 2016 production of Episode 1: The Pit.a

Telling the tale story of a young woman sent to solitary confinement whose fears threaten to overwhelm her, The Pit is part of a planned series of works by Tasmanian playwrights (episodes 2 and 3 are in development), all of which will eventually be presented as podcasts.

Featuring young actor Katie Roberston (Rosehaven, The Kettering Incident) the show challenges the audience to 40 minutes durational suspense.

The Radio Gothic collective is sound designer/composer Heath Brown and playwrights Briony Kidd, Carrie McLean and Alison Mann, who combine varied skills across theatre and filmmaking to create unique theatrical experiences.

Heath Brown spoke to Melanie Tait on Statewide Evenings about the project last week, you can listen below.

(audio used with thanks to ABC Local Radio – Tasmania):

Episode 1: The Pit opens 9 pm 15 June in the Peacock Theatre, Salamanca Arts Centre, runs until 18 June.

 

Episode 1: The Pit

Presented by Radio Gothic, HyPe and Salamanca Arts Centre in association with Dark Mofo

Produced by Heath Brown and Briony Kidd

Sound design by Heath Brown

Written by Briony Kidd (with input from Heath Brown and the creative development cast of Katie Robertson, Sara Cooper, Carrie McLean and Craig Irons)

Lighting design by Jason James

Directed by Briony Kidd

Performed by Katie Roberston, Carrie McLean, Karissa Lane and Craig Irons

Co-produced by Alison Man and Carrie Mclean

The show is approximately 40 minutes in duration.

Peacock Theatre, Salamanca Arts Centre

9 pm, 15 – 18 June 2016

Tickets $18/$25, book online or at the door (from an hour before the show) unless sold out.

This work was developed through HyPe and the RAWspace program which was supported by the Theatre Royal, Tasmania Performs and Ten Days on the Island. A showing of it was presented at the Theatre Royal Backspace in 2015.